Posts tagged ‘Ships’

Titanic Museum

The Titanic Museum in Belfast is well worth a visit. In fact I believe that it’s been regularly voted as one of the best museums in the world…….and rightly so.

The building itself is truely spectacular and everything about it’s architectural design, materials used, proportions and location have some relevance to the famous ship.

The galleries and exhibits themselves are very impressive, taking the visitor on a journey through the life and times of the ship and the men and women of Belfast who built her.

Unsurprisingly most moving of all are the exhibits that deal with the tragic events in the early hours of 15th April 1912, when the RMS Titanic hit an iceberg and sank with the loss of over 1,500 passengers and crew.

One of my favourite attractions, depicted in a couple of the photos below, is the SS Nomadic which is berthered next to the museum itself. This beautiful little ship, now restored to her original 1911 glory, served as the tender ship to the RMS Titanic and is the last remaining White Star Line ship in the world…….a fact that is even more remarkable when you consider that she also played a prominent role during the evacuation of the British and allied forces from Dunkirk in 1940.

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

Titanic Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

© Mark Simms Photography (2018)

Three Queens

To celebrate the 175th anniversary of Cunard’s first trans-atlantic crossing from Liverpool to Canada/USA, the “Three Queens” (Queen Mary 2, Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth cruise-liners) visited Liverpool together for the first time over the weekend just gone. We even had a fly-past by the “Red Arrows”, the famous Royal Air Force display team, as part of the celebrations. 

Although Cunard’s main HQ is now down in Southampton, Liverpool was Cunard’s home from 1840 until 1967 and is still very much the spiritual heart of the company. Indeed the Cunard Building, completed in 1917, is one of the famous ‘Three Graces’ at Liverpool’s Pier Head.

There were many thousands of people who lined the banks of the River Mersey for miles on either side, so when you found a spot from where you could take relatively clean, unobstructed photos you didn’t dare move. I grabbed a spot pretty close to the action on the Wirral side of the Mersey, right opposite Liverpool’s famous waterfront. This gave me a great view of each of the ships individually with some wonderful backdrops, but unfortunately I couldn’t get a view with all three ships together……..they were just too big and I was too close.

© Mark Simms Photography (2015)

St Mary’s Tower and Cammell Laird

If you don’t know the Wirral it might seem a little odd to put these two subjects together, but St Mary’s Tower (which shares the same site as the 12th Century Birkenhead Priory) stands next door to Cammell Laird’s shipbuilders. Also the tower itself is dedicated as a memorial to those who lost their lives in the 1939 disaster aboard the Laird’s built submarine Thetis.

The second and third shots were taken from the top of St Mary’s tower pictured in the first image below:

St Mary's Tower, Birkenhead, Wirral, England

Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, Wirral, England

Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, Wirral, England

Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, Wirral, England

© Mark Simms Photography (2015)

Irish Sea Tall Ships Regatta

From 31st August to 2nd September 2012 Liverpool played host to the inaugural Irish Sea Tall Ships Regatta – so I popped down with my camera to see what I could see:

I was expecting great things from this event, but in truth I was a little disappointed and as a result I struggled for inspiration – and personally I think it shows in the quality of the photos.

It wasn’t helped by choosing the wrong location for the “Parade of Sail” on the Sunday. I decided to stay on the Wirral side of the River Mersey so that I could get shots of the tall ships with the world-famous Liverpool waterfront in the background. It was a reasonable plan, except that the ships stayed close to the Liverpool shoreline on the other side of the river. For those that don’t know, Liverpool stands on the north side of the Mersey estuary and as such the river is quite wide at that point. Consequently, even with my 70-300mm lens I was struggling to get the shots I was after. The last two shots in the set above show the magnificent waterfront buildings in the background, but the ships are too small and get a little lost. The regatta did eventually sail across to the Wirral side, but unfortunately further down river from where we were positioned…..:0(…..ah well, I guess that’s photography for you!

It was good to catch up with the Pelican of London again. The last time we saw her, she was moored in Oban harbour on the west coast of Scotland.

Copyright: © The Photography of Mark Simms (2012). All rights reserved.

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