Posts tagged ‘Abbey’

Bath: Abbey & Roman Baths 1

For all Bath’s Georgian splendour, it is the Roman Baths themselves that are the City’s true treasure. The Roman structures visible today date back to approx 60 AD and for the next 1800 years they have fluctuated from being in use to being in disrepair. In fact for a long period they were buried and largely forgotton until subsidence in the area “uncovered” them again in the 1850’s.

So we have the Victorian’s to thank for their current appearance and indeed it was they who opened the baths to the public in 1897, since when they have changed little.

Because the Roman Baths are so special, I’m going to share my images of them over a number of posts. The first three of which, starting with the one below, depict the Abbey (which sits next door) from within the grounds of the Roman Baths themselves: 

The Abbey & Roman Baths, Bath, Somerset

© Mark Simms Photography (2020)

Bath: The Abbey

In amongst Bath’s Georgian splendour, sits her equally splendid medieval abbey. Although first built between 1090 and 1170, by the end of the 15th century the abbey was largely in ruins until Oliver King, Bishop of Bath and Wells from 1495 to 1503, began it’s restoration.

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

The Abbey, Bath, Somerset

© Mark Simms Photography (2020)

Chester Cathedral Exterior

I’m ashamed to say that although I have visited Chester many times (living most of my life within fairly easy reach of the city) it was only a few weeks ago that I properly explored it’s Cathedral for the first time.

Originally the abbey church of an 11th Century Benedictine monastery dedicated to St Werburgh, the Cathedral has been extensively modified and restored over the subsequent 900 or so years. Here are a few shots of the exterior, which include the Garden of Remembrance for the Cheshire Regiment which sits within the Cathedral grounds:

© Mark Simms Photography (2014)

Whitby Abbey

As you’ll know from the previous post, we spent a couple of days in Whitby over the weekend.

The main tourist attraction in the town is the ruined Benedictine Abbey which dominates the east cliff overlooking the harbour. There has been a working abbey on this site for approximately 900 years from 657AD through to the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the reign of Henry VIII in the sixteenth century. It is without question one of the most important Christian sites in the country.

You’ve probably gathered from the shots above, that weather conditions on the day weren’t exactly favourable. In fact that’s a bit of an understatement…..it was freezing!

A biting wind whipped-off the North Sea and drove squally rain showers across the exposed headland of Whitby’s east cliff. Liz and I spent most of our time trying desperately to keep the rain off the front of our lenses or huddled in a semi-sheltered spot amongst the abbey ruins.

As a result I think the photos have suffered somewhat…..but I did my best under some pretty trying conditions.

© Mark Simms Photography (2013)

%d bloggers like this: