Posts from the ‘Landscape’ category

Central Scotland Gallery of Images

A gallery of images from our trip to Central Scotland earlier this year taking in Scone Palace outside Perth, a number of sites in and around Stirling, a quick day trip to Dundee and my personal favourite, the Kelpies near Falkirk. These have all been posted previously over the past few weeks, but I’ve bought them all together in one place for you to enjoy again:

© Mark Simms Photography (2019)

Castle Doune

The once mighty fortress of Doune Castle, a few miles north of Stirling, was the stronghold of Robert Stewart, the 1st Duke of Albany, and younger brother of King Robert III. Robert was both physically infirm and politically weak and as a result Albany became governor and effective ruler of Scotland from 1386 to his death in 1420.

In recent years the castle has been used extensively as a film and TV set, most notably in productions such as Monty Python and the Holy Grail; Game of Thrones and Outlander.

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UKDoune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Doune Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

© Mark Simms Photography (2019)

Stirling Castle

Often referred to as the key to the kingdom of Scotland because of it’s strategic location at the heart of the country, there has been a castle on this site since at least the early 12th century when its first mentioned in the written record.

The castle has endured an often turbulant past, at one point changing hands 8 times in 50 years during the Scottish Wars of Independence from English rule. During this period the famous battles of Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn were fought within sight of its walls.

In later years, especially during the reign of the Stuart dynasty in both Scotland and England during the 16th and 17th centuries, the castle was transformed into a royal household with the addition of the Great Hall, the Chapel Royal and most notably the Palace of James V.

Despite the heavy overcast and wet conditions when we visited, it’s still one of my favourite castles of all time:

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

Stirling Castle, Stirling, Scotland, UK

© Mark Simms Photography (2019)

The Wallace Monument

Opened in 1869 to honour William Wallace (popularised by Mel Gibson in the film “Braveheart”) The National Wallace Monument stands on the outcrop of rock known as Abbey Craig. It overlooks the site of the Battle of Stirling Bridge where Wallace defeated an English army in 1297.

Inside, the monument contains exhibitions to William Wallace himself (including his mighty two-handed sword); the Battle of Stirling Bridge and the Hall of Heroes with it’s sculptures and stained glass depicting other famous Scots including Robert the Bruce amongst others.

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

The Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland, UK

© Mark Simms Photography (2019)

The Kelpies

The Kelpies near Falkirk are huge 100ft tall metal sculptures created by Scottish artist Andy Scott. Named after the equine water spirits of ancient Scottish myth (but modelled on two beautiful Clydesdale horses) they rise majestically above the Forth and Clyde Canal and pay homage to the areas industrial and working past.

I’ve wanted to see these for ages, and they lived up to all my expectations:

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

 

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

The Kelpies, Falkirk, Scotland, UK

© Mark Simms Photography (2019)

RSS Discovery

Right next door to the V&A in Dundee is the fascinating Discovery Museum.

The RSS Discovery has two main claims to fame. First and foremost it was the ship that took the world reknowned artic explorers Captain Scott and Ernest Shackleton on their first expedition to Antartica in 1901.

Second she was the last traditional wooden three-masted ship to be built in the United Kingdom.

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

 

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

RSS Discovery, Dundee, Scotland, UK

© Mark Simms Photography (2019)

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