Arnol Blackhouse

This “blackhouse” (so called because they had no chimney and therefore the black smoke from the peat fires filled the living quarters) at Arnol on the Isle of Lewis was built in 1885 and inhabited until 1965. It is one of the last remaining examples of a building tradition that dates back to Viking times where people and domestic animals shared the same rectangular structure.

Arnol Blackhouse, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Arnol Blackhouse, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Arnol Blackhouse, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Arnol Blackhouse, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Arnol Blackhouse, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Arnol Blackhouse, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

© Mark Simms Photography (2017)

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8 Responses to “Arnol Blackhouse”

    • Mark Simms

      Thanks Adrian…….the atmosphere was helped by the fact that they had the peat fire lit (someone was doing some filming for TV earlier). Bit tough on the lungs though 😷

      Reply
  1. Lizzy

    These are really good I’m very impressed. You should get in touch with the National Trust Scotland

    Reply
  2. สรรพชัย พรขุนทด

    Ok

    สรรพชัยพรขุนทด

    เมื่อ 4 ก.ย. 2017 00:01 “Mark Simms Photography” เขียนว่า

    > Mark Simms posted: “This “blackhouse” (so called because they had no > chimney and therefore the black smoke from the peat fires filled the living > quarters) at Arnol on the Isle of Lewis was built in 1885 and inhabited > until 1965. It is one of the last remaining examples of a ” >

    Reply

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